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Freedom

TDP Episode 88 photoEpisode 88: Freedom, by host, Laura Milkins. Our guest, Arya, tells the story of her depression and how a breakup has lead to months of crying to the point where it feels like a cleanse and maybe even a new chapter in her life. Sunday, May 13, 2018.

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New Projects

TDP Episode 87 photoEpisode 87: New Projects, by host, Laura Milkins. Our guest, Kevin Charles, tells the story of his depression and struggles with addiction, and how being smart and a little depressed can lead to seeing the glass half empty. Sunday, April 29, 2018.

24 Creative Ways To Channel Depression Or Anxiety (abbreviated) – Alanna Okun

Buzzfeed
https://www.buzzfeed.com/alannaokun/making-it-through?utm_term=.slWzgnZ0m#.atG06dmo8

We asked members of the BuzzFeed Community to show us what they’ve created during periods of depression, anxiety, and other mental health struggles.
1. Tend to some plants.
2. Take self-portraits.
3. Turn the old into the new.
4. Get out in the world…
5. …and capture what you find there.
6. Or literally turn it into art.
7. Work with makeup or body paint.
8. Blend your own scented candles.
9. Focus on a new buddy. Rescue Dog?
10. Design your dream house.
11. And your dream outfits.
12. Wrap arrowheads.
13. Bake, bake, bake.
14. Teach
15. Draw.
16. Crochet a blanket, for yourself or a beloved pal.
17. Sell what you’ve made.
18. Paint.
19. Play with fire.
20. Make your tears work for you. I would make literal tears out of fabric and embroidery
21. Know the value of even the smallest, most temporary projects.
22. Make little monsters.
23. Take up embroidery.
24. Create your life.

Ups and Downs

TDP Episode 86 photoEpisode 86: Ups and Downs, by host, Laura Milkins. Our guest, Liz Caraballo, tells the story of her depression and how having experienced “mental difference or neurological difference” allows her to be a compassionate vibrational guide and relate deeply to her clients’ needs. Sunday, April 22, 2018.

To find out more about Liz Caraballo

https://vibrationalguide.com/

https://www.facebook.com/emcaraballo?ref=br_rs

Excerpts on the show:

https://mental-health-matters.com/the-ups-and-downs-of-depression/

The Ups And Downs Of Depression
By Jeff Foster

Yes, we do know that depression is hereditary.

Depression can often be found to run throughout the generations of the same family invading the DNA molecules which make up a particular family’s genes. This causes the family members to be more susceptible to depression.

However, there is another school of thought that says perhaps the real reason we see depression run in families is that it is also environmental in that it all depends on how the children are raised. If they see the affects of depression encroaching on the lives of their family and they see the results then they will learn to deal with life the very same way.

Even though we are quite clear that depression runs in families, depression is also seen in those without any family history. stress resulting from a variety of issues, trauma, or even prescription medications or illegal drugs have all been known to cause depression.

Riding the ups and downs of depression can leave you even more exhausted that the last wave of depression you faced. Depression is known to run in cycles. You may feel completely fine one day and the next day you may be completely and utterly unable to get yourself out of the bed and out of your night clothes. The dramatic ranges of emotions are well documented in cases of depression.

Many healthcare providers and scientist alike believe that many suffering with depression manifest a chemical imbalance of Norepinephrine and Serotonin which are the feel good neurotransmitters found in the central nervous system and in the brain.

These neurotransmitters work to help control feelings of happiness and well being. The neurotransmitter Norepinephrine is thought to be a stress hormone; while Serotonin is thought to control hunger, overall moods, sleep and sexual feelings.
When these chemicals get out of whack they are thought to cause depression.

 

So if you think about it, when these neurotransmitters are out of balance it only makes sense that the roller coaster ride of depression would result. As these levels of these chemical rises and falls thereto go the emotions and feelings associated with them.

The real question is why do some people experience peaks and valleys with their chemical make up while others seem to be more stable. Again, it begs the question is it really the environment in which you were raised or is it truly the ebb and flow of the neurotransmitters that alter feelings causing the dramatic impact of depression.

Do you mirror your family because that is all you know how to do, it is the only way you know to respond or is it that you are genetically and chemically bound to your family and because of that simply have no choice of being impacted by depression.

Crazy

TDP Episode 85 photoEpisode 85: Crazy, by host, Laura Milkins. Our guest, Lauren, tell the story of her depression and illnesses, and how being smart and intuitive can make depression harder to navigate. Sunday, April 15, 2018.

“All the world is queer save thee and me, and even thou art a little queer.” – Robert Owen

“CRAZYWISE adds a voice to the growing conversation that believes a psychological crisis can be an opportunity for growth and potentially transformational, not a disease without a cure.” Crazywise – Philip Borges

 

Motivation

TDP Episode 82 photoEpisode 82:  Motivation, by host, Laura Milkins. Our guest, Jamie Moon, tells the story of her depression and how recognizing that she was deeply depressed helped her leave an abusive relationship. Sunday, March 11, 2018.

Jamie Moon’s Website: https://www.jamiemoonart.com/

Article from Healthline.com – excepts

Motivation and Depression: What’s the Connection?

https://www.healthline.com/health/depression/depression-motivation-tips

Depression and motivation

Lack of motivation is a symptom of depression, but it may be caused by something else. For example, you may lack motivation if you are having difficulties coping with an issue in your life or if you are experiencing something that affects your self-confidence.

If depression is responsible for your lack of motivation, you may find that your level of motivation is directly related to how depressed you are feeling. If you or a loved one is feeling a lack of motivation due to depression, there are ways to help improve the situation.

It may seem hard at first, but persistence will help feed the growing sense of motivation, and you will find that over time it becomes easier to get up and do things.

Tips to get and stay motivated

If the thought of doing anything seems overwhelming, start small. Set small, manageable goals. As you meet these goals, you can start adding more on top of them until you ultimately achieve all of your goals. Here are some suggestions to get you started.

1. Get out of bed and out of pajamas

2. Go for a walk

3. Get your hands dirty in order to get a mood lift

According to a study with mice, a certain type of bacteria found in dirt (Mycobacterium vaccae) may enhance the production of serotonin. Serotonin, in turn, helps decrease the symptoms of depression.

Bacteria found in fermented foods, such as yogurt, can also enhance moods by reducing anxiety and potentially improving symptoms of depression.

4. Don’t overschedule

5. Avoid negativity

6. Stick to a routine

7. Socialize

8. Create a support network

9. Get enough sleep

 

 

In a Slump

TDP Episode 81 photoEpisode 81:  In a Slump, by host, Laura Milkins. Our guest, Marianne Dissard, tells the story of her depression and discusses her new book about how the experience of being on the road for months as a musician, lead to feelings of isolation and depression. Sunday, February 25, 2018.

Marianne Dissard online:

https://mariannedissard.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mariannedissard/

https://www.youtube.com/user/mariannedissard

Excepts read on air:

Bustle

https://www.bustle.com/articles/104713-feel-a-depressive-episode-coming-on-here-are-10-things-you-can-do-to-help-yourself

Feel A Depressive Episode Coming On? Here Are 10 Things You Can Do To Help Yourself – by JP Thorpe

The reality of depression is that, rather than being a constant, it typically ebbs and flows. The patches of time where you feel seriously down are known as “depressive episodes.” That’s when depression really gets on top of you — when you can’t get out of bed and the sadness, blackness, and lack of hope seem inescapable. The good news is that they often pass relatively quickly, and with a little experience, it’s actually pretty easy to feel them coming on. If you’re starting to feel negative thoughts encroach on your brain and stop being able to enjoy things, then you know that Bad Times Are A-Comin’. But this early warning phase can actually present opportunities to help yourself prepare for your forthcoming depression.

1. Make An Appointment With A Professional, Stat

2. Give Yourself Reasons To Leave The House

3. Eat More Fish – Omega-3s, which are found in fatty, oily fish, are believed to have a positive impact on mood.

4. Up Your Exercise Game

5. Tell People Close To You

6. Start Monitoring Your Sleep And Wakefulness

7. Stock Up On Products That Support Your Well-Being

8. Schedule Something You’ll Look Forward To In The Near Future

9. Plan Time For Relaxing Self-Care

10. Try To Identify Your Triggers

Unsure

TDP Episode 80 photoEpisode 80:  Unsure, by host, Laura Milkins. Our guest, Mark Hosler, co-founder of the audio-visual group Negativland, tells the story of his depression and grief, after the loss of 6 people he was close to, and how the death of his brother years before gave him some strategies for coping. Sunday, February 18, 2018.

Links to Mark’s work

https://www.facebook.com/Negativlandland/

www.negativland.com

Excerpts from an article on Grief from WebMD

https://www.webmd.com/balance/normal-grieving-and-stages-of-grief#1

What Is Normal Grieving, and What Are the Stages of Grief?

Grief is a natural response to losing someone or something that’s important to you. You may feel a variety of emotions, like sadness or loneliness. And you might experience it for a number of different reasons. Maybe a loved one died, a relationship ended, or you lost your job. Other life changes, like chronic illness or a move to a new home, can also lead to grief.

Everyone grieves differently. But if you understand your emotions, take care of yourself, and seek support, you can heal.

What Are the Stages of Grief?
Your feelings may happen in phases as you come to terms with your loss. You can’t control the process, but it’s helpful to know the reasons behind your feelings. Doctors have identified five common stages of grief:

Denial: When you first learn of a loss, it’s normal to think, “This isn’t happening.” You may feel shocked or numb. This is a temporary way to deal with the rush of overwhelming emotion. It’s a defense mechanism.
Anger: As reality sets in, you’re faced with the pain of your loss. You may feel frustrated and helpless. These feelings later turn into anger. You might direct it toward other people, a higher power, or life in general. To be angry with a loved one who died and left you alone is natural, too.
Bargaining: During this stage, you dwell on what you could’ve done to prevent the loss. Common thoughts are “If only…” and “What if…” You may also try to strike a deal with a higher power.
Depression: Sadness sets in as you begin to understand the loss and its effect on your life. Signs of depression include crying, sleep issues, and a decreased appetite. You may feel overwhelmed, regretful, and lonely.
Acceptance: In this final stage of grief, you accept the reality of your loss. It can’t be changed. Although you still feel sad, you’re able to start moving forward with your life.

Every person goes through these phases in his or her own way. You may go back and forth between them, or skip one or more stages altogether. Reminders of your loss, like the anniversary of a death or a familiar song, can trigger the return of grief.

Talkative

TDP Episode 79 photoEpisode 79:  Talkative, by host, Laura Milkins. Our guest, Brad Poole, tells the story of his depression, starting in childhood, and how Cognitive Behavioral Therapy has helped him more with depression than medication or other types of therapy. Sunday, February 4, 2018.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/how-do-life/201501/what-if-you-talk-too-much

What If You Talk Too Much?
The cure for verbosity depends on its cause.
Posted Jan 22, 2015

In the confidentiality of my office, many clients have complained about coworkers, romantic partners, and friends who talk too much.

The cure depends on its cause.

You’d like to talk less but can’t make yourself stop. Use the Traffic Light Rule. During the first 30 seconds of an utterance, your light is green: The listener is on-board with you. During the next 30 seconds, your light is yellow: the person may be wanting you to stop, if only because s/he has something to add and fears s/he’ll forget by the time you finish. After the one-minute mark, your light is red: Yes, you’ll occasionally want to “run a red light,” for example, when telling something important or interesting that would take even a concise person more than a minute. But usually you should stop at the one-minute mark. If your conversation partner wants more, s/he may ask, and if not, you can ask “Would you like more detail?” or “Is there anything more you’d like to know about that?”

If you can’t seem to make yourself follow the Traffic Light Rule, perhaps you’re not good at estimating how long a minute is. Try this: Talk with a friend, setting a timer for one minute each time you begin an utterance. If you’re too talkative, you’ll often find yourself going on for longer.

If you predict an utterance could last more than a minute, before launching in, take just a moment to remind yourself to be concise. That will encourage you to self-edit.

You think that others appreciate your verbosity. Here are signs they’re not so appreciative: As you talk, do people other than laid-back types sometimes do one or more of the following:

  • Sigh
  • tap their fingers
  • tap their feet
  • shake their foot
  • nod impatiently as if saying “Get on with it.”
  • interrupt you
  • turn slightly away
  • take a step away
  • rarely start a conversation with you? For example, do they tend to walk past your cubicle without establishing eye-contact and in the break room not initiate conversation with you?
  • Are you the one you usually initiates contact? For example, you’re the one who phones friends and relatives?

Of course, there are many reasons a person would avoid you or feel frustrated with you, but one is loquacity.

You don’t realize you’re talking more than most people want to hear. A conversation isn’t a monologue. It’s a tennis game: back and forth with the ball in each court roughly half the time. Aim to talk between 1/3 and 2/3 of the time, in 5- to 60-second bits. If you’re often outside those ranges, you’ll probably want to change.

An unusually interesting person can make longer utterances. The question is whether you’re unusually interesting. To help assess that, ask an honest, not unduly-talkative person to have a conversation with you. Ask him or her to raise a finger each time s/he feels s/he wishes you’d stop talking.

You realize your loquacity bothers people but you decide it’s worth the price.

For example, you may enjoy talking about your vacation, pop culture, bragging about your family or even about yourself. Or you know you’ll gain clarity on an issue by continuing to talk about it until it becomes crystalline. Talking at length about such matters often comes at a particularly high price.

The takeaway

Being long-winded is a bigger problem than many talkative people realize. Fortunately, there are solutions.

Alas, while these solutions may seem easy to implement, in practice, they require a fair amount of discipline. If only unconsciously, many voluble people, despite paying the price, are heavily invested in their blabbing ways.